From Our Corner Blog Posts

  • Secretary Wyman with representatives of state agencies honored at Well Fed Well Read recognition ceremony. (Photo courtesy Philip Kerrigan) Several state agencies, including our very own Office of Secretary of State, have been honored for their generosity in donating food and children’s books. Secretary of State Kim Wyman recognized these agencies’ contributions to the Well Fed Well Read donation drive this spring during a ceremony in her office Friday. The following agencies were honored for bringing in the most food:...

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  • Paradise Ice Caves in 1920s. (Photo courtesy Washington State Digital Archives) For decades until their disappearance in the early 1990s, the Paradise Ice Caves were perhaps the most popular attraction for visitors to Mount Rainier National Park. The view inside the caves was amazing, as the icy walls and ceiling had a bluish glow to them. A cool breeze often blew through the ice caves, as if you needed reminding that you were on the highest mountain in the Northwest....

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  • Anyone who looks at a current map of Puget Sound will spot large cities like Seattle and Tacoma and familiar geographic features like Point Defiance and Elliott Bay. But when you look at old maps of the sound, you realize that some names were different. This 1889 map of Puget Sound and the Olympic Peninsula proves it. What is Elliott Bay today was known as Duwamish Bay in 1889. Alki Point had a different name back then, too — Battery...

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  • People play miniature golf with Mount Shuksan in the background. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Digital Archives) Admit it, there are worse places to play miniature golf than here. This photo, probably taken sometime in the late 1920s or early ‘30s, shows people playing “putt-putt” golf at the ill-fated Mount Baker Lodge with Mount Shuksan in the background. The lodge, which opened in July 1927 and resembled the famous Paradise Inn on Mount Rainier, had a short existence. It was...

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  • A 1917 photo of  the Kiona Peak lookout in Lewis County. (Photos courtesy of State Digital Archives) They are enduring and rustic symbols of Washington’s forests, standing sentry atop high peaks and ridges. They’re Washington’s fire lookout towers and cabins. These historic structures have long served as the first defense against forest fires. Manned by volunteers, some are still in use, while others are derelict and abandoned yet open to visitors. The high, unobstructed views from these fire lookouts are...

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