Current Grant Cycles

Refreshing School Libraries to Engage Students

Recent data showed the average copyright of many school collections is over 20 years old. Washington State Library (WSL) wants to help school libraries update nonfiction collections. Without access to current, accurate resources, research capabilities are limited. This affects schools’ ability to fulfill common core standards requiring fact-based research.

WSL will provide grants of $1,000 to school libraries for buying nonfiction books. If awarded a grant, teacher librarians will be able to select the books they wish through their normal channels. They may choose to purchase processed, shelf-ready books if they want, but the grant limit is still $1,000. WSL will reimburse schools for their purchases.

WSL is creating a suggested booklist to help in the selection process. This list will reflect recommendations from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and our teacher librarian advisory committee. This title list will be available in late May 2016.

Libraries in public and non-profit K-12 schools are eligible if they have an ongoing funding source and designated staff responsible for library operations and services.

We plan to award 200 grants. The award-winning libraries will purchase books directly from vendors of their choice. Once the books arrive, the school district will pay the vendor directly. Washington State Library will reimburse the documented costs, up to $1,000 per award.

This grant has a new application format in SurveyMonkey (link below). Be careful to answer every question, including the unscored ones. Then print on page 2, secure the signature, and mail it to the Washington State Library (WSL). WSL will not consider applications that fail to complete every question or do not send the signed page.

Application deadline: Postmarked or hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. May 10 2016.

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Digital Literacy 2016

The purpose of this grant cycle is to provide funding to public, academic, tribal, and school libraries to implement projects that support Digital Literacy projects in the community.

Projects should focus on providing skills and resources needed within a community and by patrons. Digital Literacy grant applicants are urged to utilize project partners. Project partners could include non-profits, hospitals, credit unions, local businesses, etc.

Projects should meet at least one of the following objectives:

  • Encourage the development of skills required to communicate and perform business transactions in a digital environment (e.g., applying for health insurance, using online banking) with a focus on outreach to the community.
  • Use diverse technologies appropriately to retrieve quality information (e.g., accessing library and other quality e-resources) and make them accessible to all users.
  • Support the development of skills to collaborate with others to enhance employability in a digital and evolving world (e.g., setting up and using an email account, online job searching through local partnerships).
  • Provide digital literacy assistance to underserved populations including those populations that fall into the following categories: those below the poverty line, veterans, persons with disabilities, children, teens, English as a Second Language (ESL), immigrants, senior citizens, tribal, rural, etc.. (e.g., offering targeted workshops to Veterans, offering bilingual classes, providing accessible labs for patrons with accessibility issues).

For the purposes of this grant cycle, the Washington State Library (WSL) will be using the American Library Association’s (ALA) Digital Literacy Task Force definition of Digital Literacy, which is:

…the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, understand, evaluate, create, and communicate digital information, an ability that requires both cognitive and technical skills.

A digitally literate person:

  • Possesses the variety of skills, cognitive and technical, required to find, understand, evaluate, create, and communicate digital information in a wide variety of formats.
  • Is able to use diverse technologies appropriately and effectively to search for and retrieve information, interpret search results, and judge the quality of the information retrieved.
  • Understands the relationships among technology, lifelong learning, personal privacy, and appropriate stewardship of information.
  • Uses these skills and the appropriate technologies to communicate and collaborate with peers, colleagues, family, and on occasion the general public.
  • Uses these skills to participate actively in civic society and contribute to a vibrant, informed, and engaged community.

Overall funding to support this grant cycle is $75,000. This grant cycle has a limit of $7,500 per application. It is anticipated that ten (10) or more applicants may receive awards. Awards will be made contingent upon availability of federal funds and distribution of those funds by the Washington State Library, a division of the Office of the Secretary of State.

Unfortunately, Washington State Library staff is not able to offer detailed one-on-one consulting on the final application. However, staff is available to answer questions. Staff can help determine if you should proceed with or adjust proposals or budgets before expending the resources necessary to fully plan the project and prepare a full grant application. WSL staff contact information is found in Section 11 of the guidelines. You are encouraged to use the guidelines as a resource when preparing your application.

Application deadline: Postmarked by Wednesday, May 25, 2016 or hand delivered by 4 p.m., Wednesday, May 25, 2016.

Download the guidelines and application form in Word or PDF format:

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Metadata Enhancement & Remediation Grant—Pilot Project 2016

The Washington State Library (WSL) is initiating a metadata remediation and enhancement project. We will offer grants to support public, academic, and tribal libraries in remediating, re-cataloging, and/or enhancing digital collection records currently available to the public through digital library and digital repository systems. “Digital collections” typically include digitized special collections (e.g., manuscripts, maps, visual materials), publications, or archival records. They may also include born-digital materials such as those typically accessed through institutional repositories and open-access publishing platforms.

The primary purpose of this grant is to help institutions prepare for the eventual harvest of collection metadata by a regional or state-level Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) service hub. The DPLA is a federated search portal that aggregates records from the digital collections of America’s galleries, libraries, archives, and museums The portal greatly improves discoverability of materials held at disparate institutions and acts as a platform for innovative uses of digital content. Data is contributed to the DPLA by way of standalone or multi-institutional “service hubs” working with, and harvesting, the records of institutions in specific states or regions. Although Washington State does not currently have a DPLA service hub, a number of institutions in the Pacific Northwest region are actively pursuing creation of one or more hubs.

This grant cycle will provide grant funds to libraries to help them ready their materials to meet DPLA requirements. The DPLA Metadata Application Profile (DPLA Map) specifies DPLA requirements and recommendations, especially for the “SourceResource” class. SEE Section 9 for more details on recommended and required metadata elements. For this grant cycle, particular emphasis will be placed on the “Rights” property, Awarded sub-grantees are asked to assign a discrete copyright label to digital objects, corresponding to those outlined in Recommendations for Standardized International Rights Statements. These rights statements (“labels”) were established by a working group coordinated by the DPLA and Europeana.

Grant recipients will also be directed to review the Orbis Cascade Alliance’s Dublin Core Best Practices Guidelines (draft currently in review) for assistance with metadata creation. These guidelines primarily offer guidance on the mapping of digital collection data to Dublin Core, and on the output of that data in OAI-PMH compliant format. The guidelines aim for consistency across multiple institutions and are not necessarily prescriptive in regards to local metadata practices.

Goals of the grant cycle include:

  1. Participants will have cataloged, remediated, and/or enhanced the metadata for a minimum of one complete digital collection equivalent to one “set” harvestable through an OAI-PMH service. Note: the specific approach (e.g., manual vs. automated), and amount of time and effort required to bring any given data set in line with minimum DPLA requirements may vary greatly, and is determined by numerous factors. Those applicants seeking to go beyond the minimum or “required” elements of the DPLA MAP by providing data corresponding to most or all “recommended” (when applicable) properties/elements will receive priority consideration for a grant award.
  2. Participants will acquire a basic understanding of the DPLA Metadata Application Profile. They will understand how their grant activities contribute to data quality at the service hub level and enhancement activities by the DPLA.
  3. Participants will learn to evaluate, vet, and document the copyright status of digitized works. They will make informed assignments of discrete copyright labels/statements.
  4. Participants will apply best practices for spatial and temporal data (i.e., place names and dates).

Pre- and post-grant project surveys will evaluate individual participants’ change in knowledge, skills, and abilities.

Washington State Library staff will support grant activities by:

  1. Working with awardees to develop a localized metadata remediation plan and/or providing initial consultation regarding existing metadata quality.
  2. Coordinating formal training focused on the DPLA MAP and copyright topics as they relate to digital and digitized materials.
  3. Hosting monthly online metadata Question and Answer (Q&A) meetings—a place for participants to share ideas and local practices, ask questions of metadata “experts,” and discuss challenges related to metadata remediation.
  4. Providing final quality assessment of remediated data sets.

Overall funding to support this grant cycle is $25,000. This grant cycle has a limit of $5,000 per application. We anticipate that five (5) or more applicants may receive awards. Awards are contingent upon receipt of federal funds and distribution of those funds by WSL, a division of the Office of the Secretary of State.

Unfortunately, Washington State Library staff is not able to offer detailed one-on-one consulting on the final application. However, staff is available to answer questions. Staff can help determine if you should proceed with or adjust proposals or budgets before expending the resources necessary to fully plan the project and prepare a full grant application. WRH staff contact information is found in Section 11 of the guidelines. You are encouraged to use the guidelines as a resource when preparing your application.

Application deadline: Postmarked by Friday, June 10, 2016 or hand delivered by 4 p.m., Friday, June 10, 2016.

Download the guidelines and application form in Word or PDF format:

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Washington Rural Heritage 2016

Washington Rural Heritage (WRH) is a program that supports public and tribal libraries in the development of historical digital collections (i.e., digitized primary and/or secondary sources of significance to local and state history).

The purpose of this grant cycle is to encourage the creation and/or continued development of long-term, sustainable digitization programs managed at the local level and hosted by the Washington State Library. Materials digitized using grant funds will be published online as part of the Washington Rural Heritage collection. Collaborative partnerships among libraries, museums, schools, and other community organizations are encouraged, though not required.

Public libraries, public library systems, or individual public library branches are eligible to submit applications for this grant cycle. Applicants are subject to Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) eligibility. Native American tribal libraries (as defined in Section 213 of LSTA) within Washington State are also eligible to submit applications for this grant cycle. For more information, please review the LSTA eligibility guidelines.

Overall funding to support this grant cycle is $25,000. This grant cycle has a limit of $5,000 per application. It is anticipated that five (5) or more applicants may receive awards.

Funds may be used by libraries to purchase equipment to:

  • Digitize material (e.g., scanners), or software to optimize digital files.
  • Train staff and volunteers to digitize.
  • Research and catalog items.
  • Pay salary of staff and contract services to digitize, research, and catalog items.
  • Provide outreach to promote digitization activities and completed digital collections.

Applicants must commit to submission of at least one hundred (100) items to the Washington Rural Heritage collection at the Washington State Library by the end of the grant cycle (August 18, 2017). Items submitted must follow the digitization specifications and metadata best practices outlined by the Washington Rural Heritage initiative. Applicants must consider copyright issues with the projects they develop in conjunction with their grant application.

Unfortunately, Washington State Library staff is not able to offer detailed one-on-one consulting on the final application. However, staff is available to answer questions. Staff can help determine if you should proceed with or adjust proposals or budgets before expending the resources necessary to fully plan the project and prepare a full grant application. WRH staff contact information is found in Section 11 of the guidelines. You are encouraged to use the guidelines as a resource when preparing your application.

Application deadline: Postmarked by Wednesday, May 25, 2016 or hand delivered by 4 p.m., Wednesday, May 25, 2016.

Download the guidelines and application form in Word or PDF format:

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Collaborative Summer Library Program (CSLP) grant 2016—NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

The Collaborative Summer Library Program (CSLP) is a consortium of states working together to provide a unified summer reading theme that features professional art and evidence-based materials. This helps member libraries provide high-quality summer reading programs at the lowest possible cost.

Washington State Library supports the CSLP's work because it benefits public libraries. The State of Washington is entitled to send three representatives from our state to the annual meeting each year: the WSL Youth Services Consultant, a CAYAS representative, and a youth services staff person.

This year we are selecting someone to fill this third position. This opportunity is for a public library staff member whose duties include serving youth at least 50% of the time. This commitment requires:

  1. A three year commitment (2016-2018).
  2. Attending the annual meeting (4-5 days with travel).
  3. Active participation on one or more of the following committees:
    • Adult Manual Committee
    • Budget and Finance Committee
    • Children's Manual Committee
    • Copyright/Rules of Use Committee
    • Early Literacy Committee
    • Inclusion Committee
    • Marketing and Public Relations Committee
    • Membership and Organizational Structure Committee
    • Teen Manual Committee
    • Vendor Relations Committee
    • Website Committee.

CSLP committee work is carried out via conference call, email and online meetings outside of the annual meeting. More details about the duties and responsibilities of these committees can be found in the CLSP Organizational Manual.

Application deadline: postmarked or hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Download the application form below:

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The Future STEMs from Reading grant cycle—NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

The recent recession resulted in many school districts tightening their budgets. School library resources were hard hit and many have yet to recover. Since materials in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields date more quickly, collections need to be renewed more frequently. The Washington State Library (WSL) wants to help school libraries update their STEM collections. We have put together 230 STEM book collections from lists of award-winning books aimed at elementary, middle and high school students. An advisory committee of teacher-librarians selected the books.

We are awarding 230 STEM book collections. Each has 50 books preselected from awarding winning STEM booklists, plus three professional titles for teachers. The collections will be shelf ready, i.e. the books will have jackets and appropriate spine labels. The collections are materials from the 500 and 600 Dewey numbers. Most copyrights are post 2012. There are:

  • 120 elementary school collections.
  • 55 middle school collections.
  • 55 high school collections.

The grants will be awarded via a one page application available below. All public and non-profit elementary and secondary schools are eligible to apply.

Application deadline: postmarked or hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. Friday, October 30, 2015.

Download the guidelines and the application form below:

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Exploring Technology: ET Kits grant cycle—NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

EggBot in actionThousands of technology employment opportunities in Washington State are currently going unfilled because there are not enough qualified workers. The Washington State Library (WSL) believes that access is the perfect starting point for awareness and education surrounding technology. We want to empower libraries as exploration centers for youth. We believe that enabling libraries to offer technology programs will improve access, skills and opportunities for youth. This project is designed to help libraries engage up to 20 youth at one time to help them develop their technological skills.

This grant cycle offers a Lego® Mindstorms® robotics kit or an EggBot® robotics kit to four libraries in Washington State. We expect youth will increase their science, technology, engineering, math (STEM) skills through interaction with the kits.

An archive of our August 11 informational webinar is available in our Youth Services virtual classroom.

Application deadline: Postmarked or hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. Friday, August 28, 2015.

Download the guidelines and application form below:

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Digital Literacy 2015—NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

The purpose of this grant cycle is to provide funding to public, academic (two-year, four-year college and university), tribal, and school libraries to implement projects that support Digital Literacy projects in the community.

Projects should focus on providing skills and resources needed within a community and by patrons. Digital Literacy grant applicants are urged to utilize project partners. Project partners could include non-profits, hospitals, credit unions, local businesses, etc. Applicants are also encourage to do community outreach and work with underserved populations.

Projects should meet at least one of the following objectives:

  • Encourage the development of skills required to communicate and perform business transactions in a digital environment with a focus on outreach to the community.
  • Use diverse technologies appropriately to retrieve quality information and make them accessible to all users.
  • Support the development of skills to collaborate with others to enhance employability in a digital and evolving world.
  • Provide digital literacy assistance to underserved populations including those populations that fall into the following categories: those below the poverty line, veterans, persons with disabilities, children, teens, English as a Second Language (ESL), immigrants, tribal and rural.

For the purposes of this grant cycle, the Washington State Library will be using the American Library Association’s (ALA) Digital Literacy Task Force definition of Digital Literacy.

… the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, understand, evaluate, create, and communicate digital information, an ability that requires both cognitive and technical skills.

A digitally literate person:

  • Possesses the variety of skills, cognitive and technical, required to find, understand, evaluate, create, and communicate digital information in a wide variety of formats.
  • Is able to use diverse technologies appropriately and effectively to search for and retrieve information, interpret search results, and judge the quality of the information retrieved.
  • Understands the relationships among technology, lifelong learning, personal privacy, and appropriate stewardship of information.
  • Uses these skills to participate actively in civic society and contribute to a vibrant, informed, and engaged community.

Overall funding to support this grant cycle is $75,000. This grant cycle has a limit of $7,500 per application. It is anticipated that ten (10) or more applicants may receive awards.

Due to staffing limitations, Washington State Library staff are not able to offer detailed one-on-one consulting on the final application. However, they are available to answer questions from potential applicants. Staff can help them determine if an applicant should adjust or proceed with their proposal, or modify their budget before they expend the resources necessary to fully plan the project and prepare a full grant application. Digital Literacy staff contact information is found in “Section 10” of the guidelines. You are encouraged to use the guidelines as a resource when preparing your application.

The following resources are available as examples:

Application deadline: Postmarked or hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. Friday, April 24, 2015.

Find out more about Digital Literacy initiatives at http://www.sos.wa.gov/library/libraries/projects/digitalliteracy.aspx.

Download the guidelines and application form in Word or PDF format:

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Washington Rural Heritage 2015—NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

Washington Rural Heritage (WRH) is a program that supports public and tribal libraries in the development of historical digital collections (i.e., digitized primary and/or secondary sources of significance to local and state history).

The purpose of this grant cycle is to encourage the creation and/or continued development of long-term, sustainable digitization programs managed at the local level and hosted by the Washington State Library. Materials digitized using grant funds will be published online as part of the Washington Rural Heritage collection. Collaborative partnerships among libraries, museums, schools, and other community organizations are encouraged, though not required.

Public libraries, public library systems, or individual public library branches are eligible to submit applications for this grant cycle. Applicants are subject to Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) eligibility. Native American tribal libraries (as defined in Section 213 of LSTA) within Washington State are also eligible to submit applications for this grant cycle. For more information, please review the LSTA eligibility guidelines.

Overall funding to support this grant cycle is $25,000. This grant cycle has a limit of $5,000 per application. It is anticipated that five (5) or more applicants may receive awards.

Funds may be used by libraries to purchase equipment to:

  • Digitize material (e.g., scanners), or software to optimize digital files.
  • Train staff and volunteers to digitize.
  • Research and catalog items.
  • Pay salary of staff and contract services to digitize, research, and catalog items.
  • Provide outreach to promote digitization activities and completed digital collections.

Applicants must commit to submission of at least one hundred (100) items to the Washington Rural Heritage collection at the Washington State Library by the end of the grant cycle (August 19, 2016). Items submitted must follow the digitization specifications and metadata best practices outlined by the Washington Rural Heritage initiative. Applicants must consider copyright issues with the projects they develop in conjunction with their grant application.

Unfortunately, Washington State Library staff is not able to offer detailed one-on-one consulting on the final application. However, staff is available to answer questions. Staff can help determine if you should proceed with or adjust proposals or budgets before expending the resources necessary to fully plan the project and prepare a full grant application. WRH staff contact information is found in Section 11 of the guidelines. You are encouraged to use the guidelines as a resource when preparing your application.

Application deadline: Postmarked by Friday, May 15, 2015 or hand delivered by 4 p.m., Friday, May 15, 2015.

Download the guidelines and application form in Word or PDF format:

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Funded in part by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) through the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA).